THE TUCSON FAN APPRECIATION SOCIETY PRESENTS: ELECTRIC FAN SOUND WORKS

Glenn Weyant
08/08/08
soniCanta

Story

 

THE TUCSON FAN APPRECIATION SOCIETY PRESENTS: ELECTRIC FAN SOUND WORKS IS AN INSTALLMENT FROM THE THE SONICANTA D-CONSTRUCTION SOUND SUBSCRIPTION SERIES SOLD OUT IN 2008.

THE SERIES WAS DISCONTINUED IN 2010.

ORIGINAL CD LINER NOTES:

BEFORE YOU LISTEN… A HUMBLE REQUEST

With the sweltering Summer of 08 underway, I hope this recording will open the door to your own discoveries, observations and enjoyment of the fans swirling around you everyday. If you plan to listen to this work for enjoyment, a review or as a radio broadcast, I ask that you do so in its entirety if possible. As with most of my works, this recording is designed to be more than the sum of its parts, offering the listener an immersive sonic environment. Eventually I hope to morph this recording into a live installation for multiple fans. So dim the lights find a cool comfortable place, ideally between two speakers, breathe deep and enjoy.

ABOUT THE RECORDING:

The disc you are about to hear was created by mic-ing and recording an oscillating electric fan with a variety of microphones strategically placed to "play-up" the fan's assorted tones, drones and nuances. Those tracks were then processed and mixed into a single work which is meant to represent an immersive electric fan event. The seeds of this recording were planted sometime in the late 1960's when as a child I lay awake upon my grandparent's fold-out couch in Palisades Park, New Jersey. It was summer and air-conditioning was a luxury they could not afford. But they did have an electric fan nestled in the open window beside my grandfather's Lay-Z-Boy recliner where he listened to the Met's on a plastic transistor radio. That first night  I was first drawn into the depths of a fan's drones, drifting between dreams and wakefulness, how and what I heard was transformed and energized with new possibility. In 1987 a second fan epiphany occurred during a sweltering summer night in Jersey City where I had an apartment adjacent to a park surrounded by the burned-out  husks of abandoned buildings. The thick air embraced everything that night like a damp, toxic blanket. Not a breeze stirred. In that night I lay upon my futon, drinking cool water from a jelly jar glass, once again drawn into the drone of the fan beside my bed. I consulted the radio I-Ching and twirled the dial, stumbling upon an opera broadcast that seemed to be emanating from Cuba. Lying upon my back, sweat beading down, the fan's depths soothed the night, and lulled my mind into a state of twilight wakefulness and dreams I'd last known as a child. Roughly 20 years later, again on the edge of sleep, this time on a bed in Tucson, Arizona. a third epiphany occurred as night crept into day upon the drone of a swamp cooler fan, filling my families desert home with an illusion of buoyancy, billowing curtains and scenting the air with a breeze of fresh straw.

For more recordings other data or simply to kibitz kindly visit: www.sonicanta.com.

Thank you for listening.          
 glenn

6/18/08

REVIEWS:

Wednesday December 17, 2008

Christopher DeLaurenti - Signal-to-Noise

Electric Fan Sound Works The Tucson Electric Fan Appreciation Society SonicAnta CD-R The ephemerality of downloadable music - mp3s, iPods, file sharing, and secret invitation-only servers stocked with thousands of albums – has spurred astute artists and labels to make "physical releases" special, as a smartly packaged art object, a pocket exhibition of sound, or, in the case of Electric Fan Sound Works, part of a limited edition subscription-only series. Available as a premium for joining the Tucson Electric Fan Appreciation Society or by subscribing to Glenn Weyant's SonicAnta D-Construction Sound Subscription Series at sonicanta.com, Electric Fan Sound Works is a single 30-minute composition based on a Honeywell electric fan. Recorded by, according to the liner notes, "a variety of microphones strategically placed to 'play up' the fan's assorted tones, drones, and nuances," this is industrial ambient music in its purest form. You hear the fan click on and whirr; drones gradually accumulate, and on headphones, gently tilt from left to right. I also listened at multiple volume levels through speakers at ambient sound levels and at full attention with the disc blasting. Heard in the background, Electric Fan Sound Works creates an insulating, almost comforting aural wallpaper; loud, the disc unfurls scattered knocks and pings as well as sumptuous drones piled atop one another, as if the distant din of a long-abandoned factory could echo into our ears.

Thursday August 07, 2008

Steve Jansen - Phoenix New Times :

http://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/music/the-tucson-electric-fan-appreciation-society-6429172

"The 30-minute record (The Tucson Electric Fan Appreciation Society Presents: Electric Fan Sound Works) features subtle volume and tone changes, going from an upper treble whirling to a bass-heavy drone, followed by some spooky studio mixing that makes the fan not sound like a fan anymore. So what's your first reaction? Sounds a little out there, right? But why? After all, it is just sound. Does that make it less earworthy just because an everyday noise has been captured and released on a recording? For us, one deeper question that Electric Fan provoked is this: Does the CD straddle the abstract line between our conscious and subconscious minds? Definitely so. This album questions more than answers, which creative art tends to do."